Chloe Flowers

WRITING ABOUT SPUNKY HEROINES AND THE SCOUNDRELS WHO LOVE THEM


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Meditation. Why do we need it to excel?

So…I’m trying meditation for the first time. Well, for the first time I am seriously going to give it a shot. I’m not sure how I’m supposed to clear my head and breathe when all I can think about is trying that chocolate fudge cookie recipe I found yesterday. :-/

It started with an email I received this morning from Omvana, an app I have on my phone. It was one of those apps recommended by a popular morning show a few months ago, so I downloaded and promptly forgot about it.  I remember I have it when they occasionally send me an email. For some reason, this morning I decided to click the link in the email.

I know many writers benefit from meditation. I’ve always wanted to learn how to do it, but it just feels so hokey to me and I’m pretty sure I’m doing it totally wrong. So, in the early morning anonymity of the internet, I clicked the link. It led me to an article on the website written by this dude. And I mean he is a “Dude.” I realized very quickly that I have really put myself out there among the tree huggers and the hemp weavers of the world.

Not that that’s a bad thing.

It’s just a little bit outside of my comfort zone. After reading the article, I decided that surely I can take three minutes in the morning and quietly and breathe. I have never been able to sit still in a church pew, so I’m not sure why I felt I could succeed at a three-minute meditation. I was feeling courageous so I explored the website of the article’s author and signed up for Cowabunga Dude’s newsletter. I was sent a link to his website and listened to his first tutorial on meditation, breathing in and out when he prompted.

After reading the article, I decided that surely I can take three minutes in the morning and quietly and breathe. I have never been able to sit still in a church pew, so I’m not sure why I felt I could succeed at a three-minute meditation. I was feeling courageous so I explored the website of the article’s author and signed up for Cowabunga Dude’s newsletter. His website sent me a link and I listened to his first tutorial on meditation, breathing in and out when he prompted. (And feeling like an idiot, until I remembered that I was totally alone so there was no one nearby to judge).

I have to admit I was shocked when it ended and I looked at the clock and saw that I had been sitting still for 10 minutes breathing.

And I felt pretty relaxed. I came up with a solid plan of action for my writing today. And I actually stuck to it. So I think I’ll try it again tomorrow, just to see if I get the same sort of result. I’m not drinking the KoolAid yet. I’m a marketer. We need more than one trial before making a firm conclusion…

Here’s the article, if you’re curious:

http://blog.omvana.com/mind/need-meditation-excel-life-business-sports-relationships

Here’s the first tutorial: http://cowabungalife.com/meditation1/

If you  give it a shot, let me know how it goes!

Namaste!

XOXO,

Chloe

 


2 Comments

I am a Storyfix fan

Great advice from Larry Brooks, a secret hero of mine…

Staple This To Your Forehead

has written 443 posts on Storyfix.com.You can follow Larry on Twitter, or Google+. Email the author

by Larry Brooks on April 19, 2012

All writing tips are not created equal. 

Or, among us writers, equally.

Some are so huge, so obvious, that they don’t resonate.  This one is like that.

Nobody is above it.  Which means, if you missed it, you’ve missed the point.

As someone who reads unpublished manuscripts for a living, and seen the results of this truth not being honored as it should be, I believe it should be a daily manta.  I recommend you write it backwards and staple it to your forehead, so that every time you look in the mirror you are reminded of this massively huge, diabolically subtle storytelling OMG truth.

I’ll settle for you pasting it right above your monitor.  Read this, notice this, every day you sit down to write.

You may recognize your own dance with this issue right off.  If you can’t see the wisdom in it, then you need to pay attention and discover what it means.  Because on the list of things that will tank a story, this one is right at the top.

It’s all in the italics.

If you don’t connect to the sub-text of the italics in the next three paragraphs, you’ll miss the point, And the point is career-changing.  Here it is, one of the most important writing tips you will ever hear, rendered in three parts:

The objective of storytelling, the point of it all, isn’t to write about something.

The idea isn’t even to write about something.

The highest goal of your storytelling is to write about something happening.

When you can execute the last one and still make your story about something… then and only then will you have elevated your story to the level of art.

At any given moment in your story… in each and every scene of your story… ask yourself: what is happening here?  Right now?  How does it connect to what’s come before… how does it relate to what will happen next, and thereafter?

You should begin with that last piece as your goal.  And then evolve your story to allow it to embrace the first two.

So rather than asking (or answering, when asked) “what’s the story about?”… ask and answer this instead: “what happens in your story?”

When you know the difference, you’ll have crossed a threshold that will empower your stories, and perhaps your writing career, to greatness.