Chloe Flowers

WRITING ABOUT SPUNKY HEROINES AND THE SCOUNDRELS WHO LOVE THEM


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Meditation. Why do we need it to excel?

So…I’m trying meditation for the first time. Well, for the first time I am seriously going to give it a shot. I’m not sure how I’m supposed to clear my head and breathe when all I can think about is trying that chocolate fudge cookie recipe I found yesterday. :-/

It started with an email I received this morning from Omvana, an app I have on my phone. It was one of those apps recommended by a popular morning show a few months ago, so I downloaded and promptly forgot about it.  I remember I have it when they occasionally send me an email. For some reason, this morning I decided to click the link in the email.

I know many writers benefit from meditation. I’ve always wanted to learn how to do it, but it just feels so hokey to me and I’m pretty sure I’m doing it totally wrong. So, in the early morning anonymity of the internet, I clicked the link. It led me to an article on the website written by this dude. And I mean he is a “Dude.” I realized very quickly that I have really put myself out there among the tree huggers and the hemp weavers of the world.

Not that that’s a bad thing.

It’s just a little bit outside of my comfort zone. After reading the article, I decided that surely I can take three minutes in the morning and quietly and breathe. I have never been able to sit still in a church pew, so I’m not sure why I felt I could succeed at a three-minute meditation. I was feeling courageous so I explored the website of the article’s author and signed up for Cowabunga Dude’s newsletter. I was sent a link to his website and listened to his first tutorial on meditation, breathing in and out when he prompted.

After reading the article, I decided that surely I can take three minutes in the morning and quietly and breathe. I have never been able to sit still in a church pew, so I’m not sure why I felt I could succeed at a three-minute meditation. I was feeling courageous so I explored the website of the article’s author and signed up for Cowabunga Dude’s newsletter. His website sent me a link and I listened to his first tutorial on meditation, breathing in and out when he prompted. (And feeling like an idiot, until I remembered that I was totally alone so there was no one nearby to judge).

I have to admit I was shocked when it ended and I looked at the clock and saw that I had been sitting still for 10 minutes breathing.

And I felt pretty relaxed. I came up with a solid plan of action for my writing today. And I actually stuck to it. So I think I’ll try it again tomorrow, just to see if I get the same sort of result. I’m not drinking the KoolAid yet. I’m a marketer. We need more than one trial before making a firm conclusion…

Here’s the article, if you’re curious:

http://blog.omvana.com/mind/need-meditation-excel-life-business-sports-relationships

Here’s the first tutorial: http://cowabungalife.com/meditation1/

If you  give it a shot, let me know how it goes!

Namaste!

XOXO,

Chloe

 


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Innovation isn’t about solo genius, it’s about collective genius.

“Innovation isn’t about solo genius, it’s about collective genius.” Linda Hill

We creative types are always trying to find new ways to bolster our creativity. As writers, we tend to take that burden upon our own shoulders and sit in an office with our hands on the keyboard begging our muse to wake up and get it in gear.

Although our profession is mostly a solitary one, we do in effect use collective creativity when we interact with others on various forums, join writers groups, create critique groups, and stay involved in social media. Even taking your laptop to a local coffee shop can be helpful. You may not be asking other strangers in the shop for creative input, but chances are you’ll notice in mannerism or idiosyncrasy or scent or color or habit, and it will work its way into one of your characters or settings.

In the TedTalk link below, Linda Hill spends a few minutes talking about the collective genius that exists in highly successful companies such as Pixlar and Google. If you have 15 minutes, it’s worth watching.